Rian_Dundon_Photography

This project grew out of my existing personal relations—mostly people I grew up with who I hadn’t seen since high school. Coming home I found people dealing with everyday issues: employment, housing, family. Some were in a state of recovery or relapse into addiction. A few had been locked up. I saw in them some reflection of the dislocation I was feeling: not just with returning home after years away but with this growing sense of loss that perhaps is the natural company of aging. These weren’t the innocent kids I had grown up with and I didn’t know how to reconcile my former associations with home with the new reality I had returned to. It was like I had missed the intervening chapters of an alternate life and was now walking in on its aftermath. The good years had happened without me.—Rian Dundon

When photographer Rian Dundon returned home in 2012 after six years photographing in China, he felt adrift. He knew it was time to go back to California, but he’d been away so long he wasn’t sure what California meant anymore. So he decided to figure it out through his camera. His attraction to the menace, potential, and finality of the place—the Westward limit of these expansive United States—made him look at that particularly American blend of individualism and isolation as it applied to his friends and himself. His photographs present an unsettling series of threadbare cultural symbols, worn landscapes, and youth just past. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Rian Dundon

Rian_Dundon_Photography

Rian_Dundon_Photography

Rian_Dundon_Photography

Rian_Dundon_Photography

Rian_Dundon_Photography

Rian_Dundon_Photography

Rian_Dundon_Photography

Rian_Dundon_Photography

Rian_Dundon_Photography

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