Archives for posts with tag: aging

Zed_Nelson_Photography

As our role models become ever younger and more idealized, we are so afraid of aging that the quest for youthful preservation generates an almost pathological obsession with our bodies. As we align our sense of self-worth with self-image, the psychological and emotional consequences are tortuous. The one thing we do know for certain is that our body will always, in the end, betray us.
—Zed Nelson

Love Me is a series by London-based photographer Zed Nelson that explores the insidious power of the global beauty industry and reflects on the cultural and commercial forces that drive pathological obsessions with youth and beauty. Shot over the last five years in 18 countries across five continents, the series brings into question our place within a culture that compels us to endlessly judge, and be judged, by our appearance. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Zed Nelson

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

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Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

Zed_Nelson_Photography

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Todd_Antony_Photography

London-based photographer Todd Antony recently spent some time in Sun City, a retirement city boasting 37,000 residents situated near Phoenix, Arizona, where he came across ‘The Sun City Poms’. They were very happy to be photographed striking their best pose against the immaculate backdrop of their sunny paradise. Antony says on his blog that spending time with these ladies made him consider how Americans view the aging process; at one end of the spectrum are the child beauty pageants (kids trying to fast-track their years) whilst at the other end are these fabulous pom pom ladies who are successfully and gracefully holding them back. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Todd Antony

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Todd_Antony_Photography

Todd_Antony_Photography

 

Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

When I first tried on her gray wig, the latex makeup, and her clothes, I gazed at the mirror for a long time. My initial reaction was to chuckle, but I started feeling a little uneasy soon after. The wrinkled face staring back at me resembled my own with thirty-plus years added to it. When I smiled, she smiled back at me. When I pouted, she pouted too. It was the first time I had met her, but she was simultaneously someone I already knew quite well and someone I knew nothing about. It has been a year and half since I started photographing Kikuchiyo-san and I have gotten used to dressing up as her. However, when I think of what could happen if we ran into each other in a crowded train station or during a walk in the park, I get uneasy imagining her say, “I used to be you.”—Kyoko Hamada

Brooklyn-based photographer Kyoko Hamada steps out of her comfort zone in her latest series I Used to be You. Her work often consists of ordinary people and objects that she stages into quiet moments that explore various metaphors, but this time around Hamada turns the camera on herself to capture Kikuchiyo-san, the future version of herself. The series was born after Hamada spent time volunteering as a visitor to various seniors in NYC. When she discovered that none of the seniors she was working with were interested in being photographed, she decided to experiment on herself. The project turned into an exploration of aging, memory, and the different phases of life. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Kyoko Hamada

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Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

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Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

Kyoko_Hamada_Photography