Archives for posts with tag: Australia

Amber McCaig

By using a combination of portraits and still life elements, I have been able to create an exploration into the idea of identity and imagination, providing an insight into what it is like to live out your fantasies in everyday life. Spanish pirates, Venetian noblewomen and 11th century Vikings have escaped out of the darkness of the past and are now living in the future, placed on a stage for all to see. Laden with armor, treasure chests, maps and lore, these fantasies show the power of our imagination and what we can create if we dare to dream.
— Amber McCaig

Australian photographer Amber McCaig explores when history and storytelling converge in the colorful and elaborate world of Medieval and Renaissance reenactors. The Society for Creative Anachronism is an organization where thousands of dedicated people are committed to researching and recreating the arts, skills, and traditions of pre-17th century Europe. Members feast, fight, and dress all in the era of their choosing, often using the transformation to alter their own personalities and temperaments. Here one can choose who they wish to be and often craft a ‘hyper’ version of themselves in a way unavailable in everyday society. McCaig’s interest in this transformative identity plays out in painterly photographs full of dark, deep tones and stoic poses. The mixture of portrait and still life act as potential clues to who these characters may be and every detail is constructed with great care. Unlike the every day social struggles and pretensions, Imagined Histories is a world where the past and future can be all one’s own. Imagined Histories is currently showing from November 6-23 at the Edmund Pearce Gallery in Melbourne, Australia. McCaig also recently won the Ballarat International Foto Biennale portfolio review prize for the same work. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

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Emmanuel_Angelicas_Photography

My parents moved to Marrickville when I was four years old, and my father gave me my first camera, a plastic Diana for my seventh birthday. It was then that I made friends with the camera and photography. Marrickville is my home. I love it here. Every time I go out with my camera in Marrickville I return with compelling outcomes. It is is a real place with real people. Photography has this power to render things sometimes so real that they seem unreal.
—Emmanuel Angelicas

I could not write a better summation of Australian photographer Emmanuel Angelicas’ work than the one he gave me. And he should know—since the age of seven, Angelicas has been photographing his neighborhood, an outlying section of Sydney, Australia called Marrickville. He has been documenting the day-to-day happenings of this place for 45 years to date. Here are some gems from his vast archive. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Emmanuel Angelicas

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Emmanuel Angelicas

Emmanuel Angelicas

Emmanuel Angelicas

Emmanuel Angelicas

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Emmanuel_Angelicas_Photography

Emmanuel Angelicas

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Emmanuel_Angelicas_Photography

NEW_BOETKER_SMITH_Photography

At 2530km, the Murray River is Australia’s longest waterway, meandering through the country from the Snowy Mountains to the Southern Ocean. Over the many decades since European settlement, the river has become a wrought system of dams, weirs and channels that have restricted and politicized its flow. Melbourne-based photographer Daniel Boetker-Smith combines portraits, still-lifes and landscapes to create The Murray River Project, a modern-day compendium of stories found along the Murray, journeying into environmental and social landscapes that stretch along it. Employing strategies of chronological anarchy, the project’s unfolding narrative is a poignant cue for storytelling that is non-linear and multi-layered—like life, like memory, or like the river. Rather than forming one conclusive narrative, the Murray images speak to each other, posing quiet questions. What does the young male see behind closed eyes? Did he go fishing by the river with his father, whom he lost? The book on English, to whom does it belong? Or better still what have they left behind, and what have they found? With an unerring eye for detail, Boetker-Smith lets us discover—with slight unease—a realm of history, identity and possibility. His images, at once interrogative and reflexive, prevent us from arriving, for the only destination is within. If we get lost, it doesn’t matter. So we are bound to depart—from nature, youth, a country, a language, the world. That fallen yellow fruit might well be poisonous. Boetker-Smith presents us with a puzzle, and the arrangements, those we may make ourselves. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Daniel Boetker-Smith

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NEW_BOETKER_SMITH_Photography

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NEW_BOETKER_SMITH_Photography

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NEW_BOETKER_SMITH_Photography

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NEW_BOETKER_SMITH_Photography

Michael-Corridore_Photography

Australian photographer Michael Corridore’s powerful project “Angry Black Snake” was photographed at a car festival in Victoria, Australia over a period of six years. The photographs were taken during burnout competitions. The hazy and ethereal effect of the scenes comes from the smoke emitted by the cars. “The smoke is a by-product of the competition where participants perform donuts with their high powered cars and try to pop their rear tires. The crowds love the spectacle and spur on the competitors by chanting and cheering. That atmosphere is highly charged and literally thick with acrid smoke from the tires.” What attracted him to this long- term series? “I was drawn to the event through my interest in customized cars and the culture, which comes with that world. My intention was to photograph portraits of participants at the event as a point of departure. During one of the many burnout competitions, I became more fascinated by the landscape, the crowds and the censorship of these elements by the acrid dense smoke generated by the competitors and their customized cars. The smoke screen that envelops the crowd censors the landscape, and crowds change the form of the landscape. The smoke, although it appears to hang eternally in the photographs, would only last seconds, particularly if there were any breeze to speak of. I would not walk away form each event with many photographs that I was satisfied with, thus necessitating my annual pilgrimage to the event. The vale of the smoke created an uneasy sense of uncertainty, and manipulated the situation and the understanding of what was taking place.” Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Michael Corridore

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Michael-Corridore_Photography

RAPHAELA_ROSELLA_Photography

Raphaela Rosella is a documentary photographer based in Brisbane, Australia. Following on from We met a little early but I get to love you longer, her new series You didn’t take away my future, you gave me a new one urges us deeper still into the world of three young (Australian) mothers: Nunjul, Tammara and Rowrow. Exploring the realities of cyclic disadvantage and limited choice, a certain quietness within the images begs us to take our time and take a long look—not only at the images, but at ourselves, urging us to question our readiness to pass judgement, to stigmatise, to stereotype. With a profound clarity and gentleness of vision, Rosella tells a story of loss and of hope, of vulnerability and of resilience. You didn’t take away my future, you gave me a new one is an account of love, of waiting, and of the passing of time. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Raphaela Rosella

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RAPHAELA_ROSELLA_Photography

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RAPHAELA_ROSELLA_Photography

Kelly_HS_Alan_Hill_Photography

Kelly Hussey-Smith and Alan Hill are two photographers based in Brisbane, Australia. Working individually and collaboratively, they seek to tell stories about the human condition. In Central Queensland Project, the photographers explore an economically powerful region of Australia largely unknown to the outside world. A significant hub for primary industries, the area is one of the country’s major coal producing regions. In their study of Central Queensland (CQ), the pair was “initially drawn to the unique visual characteristics of the area: cane fields, minescapes, impeccable suburban lawns, and the vastness of the land.” However, they soon noticed CQ to be in a state of transition. A work in progress, this project delves into the realities of this transition, drawing a record of contemporary life in Central Queensland. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Kelly Hussey-Smith and Alan Hill

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Kelly_HS_Alan_Hill_Photography

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Bryan Schutmaat photography

Since he picked up photography in 2003, Bryan Schutmaat’s work has been exhibited and published in the United States, Europe, Asia and Australia. Bryan is a member of Young Photographers United, and last year he was featured in the Humble Arts Foundation’s Collectors’ Guide to Emerging Art Photography. He holds a degree in history from the University of Houston and will pursue an MFA in photography in the fall of 2010 at the University of Hartford. This work is from his series, Western Frieze. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Bryan Schutmaat

Bryan Schutmaat photography

Bryan Schutmaat

Bryan Schutmaat

Bryan Schutmaat photography

Bryan Schutmaat photography

Bryan Schutmaat photography

Gideon Mendel’s ‘Drowning World’ series, an ongoing global project about flooding, is now showing at the East Wing Galleries at Somerset House from May 10th to June 5th 2012. He writes: ‘Since 2007 I have visited six countries (The UK, India, Haiti, Pakistan, Australia and Thailand) that have been devastated by massive flooding. I have done this as an attempt to visually address the issue of climate change. ‘I chose to shoot on film, using old Rolleiflex cameras. The heart of the project is a series of portraits of flood victims at their homes within the landscape of their own personal calamity. Making these images often involved returning with them through waist high floodwaters so they could show their circumstances to the world. ‘My intention is to depict them as individuals, not as nameless statistics. Coming from disparate parts of the world, their faces show us their linked vulnerability despite the vast differences in their lives and circumstances.’ Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Gideon Mendel

flood victims Gideon-Mendel photography

flood victims Gideon-Mendel photography

flood victims Gideon-Mendel photography

flood victims Gideon-Mendel photography

flood victims Gideon-Mendel photography

flood victims Gideon-Mendel photography

gideon mendel

For the past six years I have been photographing the sub-culture of burnout competitions in Australia. The guys and girls who compete in the various competitions across Australia are a passionate bunch. As a photographer I enjoy the visual feast of a superb and powerful car on the black of the burnout pad juxtaposed against the softness of the tire smoke. In reality a burnout is extremely loud and aggressive but in the photos there is a sense of calm… poetic in a way. Born in New Zealand, raised in Sydney, Simon Davidson discovered photography at the age of 25. His early years of photography were spent in the darkroom developing film and printing black and white images. Moving to New York in the late nineties to assist fashion photographers, Davidson returned to Australia in the new millennium to further assist before dabbling in fashion photography. A chance excursion to a street drag racing meet one cold winter evening changed the direction of his work, and he has been photographing Australian custom car culture as a personal endeavour for the last decade. This project has allowed him a healthy editorial career in the Australian modified and custom V8 car scene, leading to an advertising career. While the cars are central to the project, the people, and the characters are a rich source of subject. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Simon Davidson

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

Jasper White is a London-based commercial and editorial photographer who investigates spaces synonymous with daily life. During a trip to Australia, White discovered the local male obsession with sheds. These practical spaces are often treated as male-only sanctuaries and, in some cases, an unofficial local bar. Prints from Sheds are available through gallery nine5. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Jasper White

man-cave jasper white photography

man-cave jasper white photography

man-cave jasper white photography

man-cave jasper white photography

man-cave jasper white photography

man-cave jasper white photography

man-cave jasper white photography