Archives for posts with tag: Brooklyn-based

 

EvaOLeary_HarryGriffin_Photography

Brooklyn-based photographers Eva O’Leary and Harry Griffin have wanted to collaborate for some time. Devil’s Den, their forthcoming book, started as a conversation on a road trip they took from Florida to Pennsylvania. They began to imagine the epic scale of the Battle of Gettysburg. Something about the ‘act of reenacting’ struck a chord, both the theatricality of the battle and the popularity of sensationalized violence. As they drove from the south to the north, many questions came up. What does it mean to reenact a battle without the gore, avarice, and blood of war? Is it a celebration of the birth of the country as we know it, or an escape from a national environment of deep-seated uncertainty, division, and debt? They say of the project, shot during the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania: There’s something fascinating about the spectacle of this event, the collision between old and new. With 300,000 tourists and 15,000 reenactors, it’s a huge commercial draw for the small town (pop. 7,000). When you’re there, the battlefield almost feels like a replacement for a huge sports stadium, fully equipped with grand stands and concessions. The town revolves around 1863, and survives on the economic bubble of war tourism. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Eva O’Leary and Harry Griffin

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EvaOLeary_HarryGriffin_Photography

EvaOLeary_HarryGriffin_Photography

EvaOLeary_HarryGriffin_Photography

EvaOLeary_HarryGriffin_Photography

EvaOLeary_HarryGriffin_Photography

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EvaOLeary_HarryGriffin_Photography

EvaOLeary_HarryGriffin_Photography

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Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

When I first tried on her gray wig, the latex makeup, and her clothes, I gazed at the mirror for a long time. My initial reaction was to chuckle, but I started feeling a little uneasy soon after. The wrinkled face staring back at me resembled my own with thirty-plus years added to it. When I smiled, she smiled back at me. When I pouted, she pouted too. It was the first time I had met her, but she was simultaneously someone I already knew quite well and someone I knew nothing about. It has been a year and half since I started photographing Kikuchiyo-san and I have gotten used to dressing up as her. However, when I think of what could happen if we ran into each other in a crowded train station or during a walk in the park, I get uneasy imagining her say, “I used to be you.”—Kyoko Hamada

Brooklyn-based photographer Kyoko Hamada steps out of her comfort zone in her latest series I Used to be You. Her work often consists of ordinary people and objects that she stages into quiet moments that explore various metaphors, but this time around Hamada turns the camera on herself to capture Kikuchiyo-san, the future version of herself. The series was born after Hamada spent time volunteering as a visitor to various seniors in NYC. When she discovered that none of the seniors she was working with were interested in being photographed, she decided to experiment on herself. The project turned into an exploration of aging, memory, and the different phases of life. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Kyoko Hamada

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Doug_Adesko_Photography

Brooklyn-based photographer Doug Adesko started his series Family Meal to capture an insight into American family life by documenting families eating together. To date, he’s made roughly 75 portraits over the past decade. His interest arose from early childhood memories, and grew as he watched his own daughter at the family table. The portraits seem simple at first glance, but a second, deeper look presents a subtle range of detail—dynamics among family members, hierarchy within the family group, and glimpses into how personality traits affect the behavior of adults and children when together. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Doug Adesko

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Malka_Oppermann_Photography

Throughout the trip, the only consistent form of structure was the company of one another. Time became elastic and weeks departed from what our knowledge of what a “week” meant. As a result, we have collected an array of photographs which emote our sense of constant displacement yet express a deep love of travel and discovery.—Yael Malka and Cait Oppermann

After their recent graduation from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn-based photographers Yael Malka and Cait Oppermann backpacked for 70 days through Turkey, Morocco and several countries in Europe. The photos they took during that time are now collected in their self-published book Sea Blues. Filled with idiosyncratic extractions from the artists’ journey as well as portraits of one another, Sea Blues is a collaboration between friends. These are notes from the road, a traveler’s handbook that allows the viewer to share in the amazing freedom of summery vagabonding in strange lands. A book launch will take place at Molasses Books in Brooklyn on May 17, 2013. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Yael Malka and Cait Oppermann

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