Archives for posts with tag: Italian

annadiprospero_Photography

This series of self-portraits with my family comes from the desire to create a research based on my intimate bonds. For me, the most important part of this work was obtained by the involvement of my family during the shooting, and thanks to this experience, I discovered unknown aspects of my loved ones.—Anna di Prospero

What one first notices about Italian photographer Anna di Prospero’s work are the warm, rich hues of her portraits. But after a closer look at her series, Self-Portrait with My Family, the colorful hues and tones are an obvious expression of the warmth and connection she feels for her family. Each photograph contains its own personal narrative, each telling the story of that particular relationship. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Anna di Prospero

annadiprospero_Photography

annadiprospero_Photography

annadiprospero_Photography

annadiprospero_Photography

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Luigi_Bonaventura_Photography

Behind the Edge showcases hotel facades in Jesolo Beach, Venice. Shot by Italian born, New York-based photographer Luigi Bonaventura, his intention is to show each structure as its Platonic ideal—as the architect imagined it. The repetitive forms and pops of color combine to create a graphic, eye-pleasing series. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Luigi Bonaventura

Luigi_Bonaventura_Photography

Luigi_Bonaventura_Photography

Luigi_Bonaventura_Photography

Luigi_Bonaventura_Photography

Luigi_Bonaventura_Photography

Luigi_Bonaventura_Photography

Luigi_Bonaventura_Photography

gabriele_galimberti_Photography
Chiwa – Mchinji, Malawi

Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti’s project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys. Galimberti explores the universality of being a kid amidst the diversity of the countless corners of the world; saying, “at their age, they are pretty all much the same; they just want to play.” But it’s how they play that seemed to differ from country to country. Galimberti found that children in richer countries were more possessive with their toys and that it took time before they allowed him to play with them (which is what he would do pre-shoot before arranging the toys), whereas in poorer countries he found it much easier to quickly interact, even if there were just two or three toys between them. There were similarites too, especially in the functional and protective powers the toys represented for their proud owners. Across borders, the toys were reflective of the world each child was born into—economic status and daily life affecting the types of toys children found interest in. Toy Stories doesn’t just appeal in its cheerful demeanor, but it really becomes quite the anthropological study. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Gabriele Galimberti

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Stella – Montecchio, Italy

gabriele_galimberti_photography
Pavel – Kiev, Ukraine


Arafa & Aisha – Bububu, Zanzibar

gabriele_galimberti_photography
Cun Zi Yi – Chongqing, China

gabriele_galimberti_photography
Bethsaida – Port au Prince, Haiti

gabriele_galimberti_photography
Orly-Brownsville,Texas

gabriele_galimberti_photography
Botlhe – Maun, Botswana

gabriele_galimberti_Photography
Watcharapom – Bangkok, Thailand


Alessia – Castiglion Fiorentino, Italy

gabriele_galimberti_photography
Norden – Massa, Morocco

gabriele_galimberti_photography
Julia – Tirana, Albania

gabriele_galimberti_photography
Keynor – Cahuita, Costa Rica

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Shaira – Mumbai, India

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Tangawizi – Keekorok, Kenya

Rä di Martino

Italian, New York-based photographer Rä di Martino rouses the Star Wars fan in all of us in Every World’s A Stage, a series of photos of the abandoned Hollywood sets constructed for the epic George Lucas film. Martino spent over a year traveling throughout the desert towns of Morocco and Tunisia, exploring these massive structures that stand almost like ancient ruins. Martino found the juxtaposition of these cinematic byproducts with the actual ruins existing in these towns quite fascinating—and we do too. What’s not intriguing about the remnants of an otherworldly place amidst a worldly one? Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Rä di Martino

Rä di Martino

Rä di Martino

Rä di Martino

Rä di Martino

Rä di Martino

Roberto-Schena SP 67 photography

Roberto Schena’s SP 67 is a book of photographs about being in-between. In between day and night, waking and dreaming, and the beginning and end of a journey. Schena spent three years documenting 13 kilometers of fog-shrouded, boar-filled forests between Italy’s Genoa and Calcinara. The bulk of the images are sandwiched between two short stories by Paolo Caredda. The first, the narrative of a contemplative lieutenant guiding his troops through the woods parallels Schena’s subsequent imagery. In the second story, forming the epilogue, contemporary friends make discoveries on the fringes of city and wilderness. Long exposure images portray the motion of a frantic walk through the trees while still images capture the signs of life amidst the landscape. The sequencing of the photos is clever, carefully revealing the pace and timeline of Schena’s strange and unnerving journey. Schena is an Italian fine-art photographer based in Milan. Published by Punctum this year, SP 67 La Strada Della Tramontana Scura (The Road of the Dark North) includes 51 color plates. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Roberto Schena

Roberto-Schena SP 67 photography

Roberto-Schena SP 67 photography

Roberto-Schena SP 67 photography

Roberto-Schena SP 67 photography

Roberto-Schena SP 67 photography

Roberto-Schena SP 67 photography