Archives for posts with tag: medieval

Amber McCaig

By using a combination of portraits and still life elements, I have been able to create an exploration into the idea of identity and imagination, providing an insight into what it is like to live out your fantasies in everyday life. Spanish pirates, Venetian noblewomen and 11th century Vikings have escaped out of the darkness of the past and are now living in the future, placed on a stage for all to see. Laden with armor, treasure chests, maps and lore, these fantasies show the power of our imagination and what we can create if we dare to dream.
— Amber McCaig

Australian photographer Amber McCaig explores when history and storytelling converge in the colorful and elaborate world of Medieval and Renaissance reenactors. The Society for Creative Anachronism is an organization where thousands of dedicated people are committed to researching and recreating the arts, skills, and traditions of pre-17th century Europe. Members feast, fight, and dress all in the era of their choosing, often using the transformation to alter their own personalities and temperaments. Here one can choose who they wish to be and often craft a ‘hyper’ version of themselves in a way unavailable in everyday society. McCaig’s interest in this transformative identity plays out in painterly photographs full of dark, deep tones and stoic poses. The mixture of portrait and still life act as potential clues to who these characters may be and every detail is constructed with great care. Unlike the every day social struggles and pretensions, Imagined Histories is a world where the past and future can be all one’s own. Imagined Histories is currently showing from November 6-23 at the Edmund Pearce Gallery in Melbourne, Australia. McCaig also recently won the Ballarat International Foto Biennale portfolio review prize for the same work. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

Amber McCaig

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Christian Tagliavini is a photographer who lives and works in Lugano, Switzerland.  He has been in several group exhibitions in Switzerland and his work has been published in magazines such as Eyemazing and toBE – Lux [R]evolution. This work is from his series 1503 (2010) and Dame Di Cartone (2008). Taken from Feature Shoot.

All images © Christian Tagliavini

Christian Tagliavini

Christian Tagliavini

Christian Tagliavini

Christian Tagliavini

Christian Tagliavini

Christian Tagliavini

Christian Tagliavini

Christian Tagliavini

I was about 14 when I was first introduced to Jethro Tull. My friend Oskar had inherited their whole back catalogue on vinyl from his father and we were slowly discovering this marvelous band, one record at the time. I was in love from the start, but it hasn’t been an easy relationship. I don’t really know why progressive rock has such an awful reputation but I can’t think of any other band that I like that I have had to defend so hard and taken so much shit for liking. It’s more socially accepted to listen to country or even folk than to English progressive rock. When I worked for the national radio in my early twenties it was the daily joke that I actually liked a band who’s singer and main composer had long hair, a big beard and played the flute standing on one leg. It didn’t really help that Ian Anderson loved to dress in tights, high boots and quite medieval looking waistcoats. Here is a little collection of my favourite acoustic Jethro Tull songs. I think that Ian is a brilliant finger picker and great composer.

Claes Jethro Tull playlist

Jethro Tull