Archives for posts with tag: Russia

Norman Jean Roy

Ginta Lapina is photographed by Norman Jean Roy and styled by Anya Ziourova for the December 2013 cover story of Allure Russia, with hair by Deycke Heidorn and makeup by Yumi Mori. Taken from Fashiontography

All images © Norman Jean Roy

Norman Jean Roy

Norman Jean Roy

Norman Jean Roy

Norman Jean Roy

Norman Jean Roy

Norman Jean Roy

Anastasia RudenkoAnastasia Rudenko, Nelidovo Rehab Center

Life in Motion reveals a side to Russia’s orphanages less reported. The project, led by photographer Ed Kashi, was the incentive of the NGO Happy Families, whose aim it was to utilize images taken by ten photography graduates to raise awareness towards the need for public access for the disabled in Russia, as well as the potential for an accessible adoption system. With the graduates hailing from New York’s International Center of Photography and the Rodchenko Moscow School of Photography, Life in Motion captures the young subjects of Russia’s much disputed childcare system under a prismatic light. “What is most palpable,” asserts Kashi, “is the individual personality of the photographer. Some approached the project with a real hyper-intellectuality, some were very emotional, others detached, or they were really photographically engaged.” For most of the American photographers it was a visual documentation of their first time in Russia. “It was intense for them,” says Kashi, “it was a more emotional, more massive experience.”

Kashi’s instructions to the group were simple: stay out of the caretakers’ way, maintain the subjects’ dignity, be respectful and find intimacy. Due to the delicacy of the subject matter, obtaining the access necessary to achieve any meaningful picture was no easy task. As well as the severity of some of the children’s mental disability, Kashi recalls other obstacles that made engagement with the subjects and their environment something of a challenge. “Some of the admin staff were the hardest folk. They didn’t get it and wouldn’t give permission.” This lack of cooperation, he continues, comes with a territory where showing up with a camera is not only viewed as intrusive but also compromising for those whose livelihoods depend on the institution’s good reputation.

Certainly in Western media, Russia’s orphanages have been placed under a critical eye with past reports appertaining to descriptions of neglect, abuse and lifelong institutionalization. If it was negative association with such cases that was the cause of their reluctance, the staff of these homes had little to fear. On the contrary, Kashi praises the dedication of the caretakers he encountered. His sentiments are reflected in many of the Life in Motion exhibits, which emphasize the broad spectrum of childhood discovery, capturing instances of hope, play, ambition and the sense of community felt amongst the children. In a world so oversaturated with images, questions are raised regarding the effectiveness of such a project for creating public impact and generating response, but Kashi is optimistic. “Whilst we are oversaturated with media, within that I see an avenue to have greater impact. There is the chance now to have a targeted audience. Your story may only reach three thousand people, but they can be change-makers who will be emboldened to take further action.” After distributing the Life in Motion images through the Russian press and an exhibition in New York last year, Happy Families is selling the prints online. And while this year President Putin is finally overhauling Russia’s adoption system and closing a number of orphanages in favor of a functioning foster care system, the charity continues opening doors to disabled orphans worldwide in the form of healthcare, education and adoption schemes. If you are one of the emboldened three thousand, please visit here. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Ed Kashi

Anastasia RudenkoAnastasia Rudenko, Nelidovo Rehab Center

Brian DriscollBrian Driscoll, Dmitrovsky Orphanage

Brian DriscollBrian Driscoll, Dmitrovsky Orphanage

Erin Michael JohnsonEric Michael Johnson, Sergiev Posadsky Orphanage for Deaf & Blind Children

Erin Michael JohnsonEric Michael Johnson, Sergiev Posadsky Orphanage for Deaf & Blind Children

Giacomo PirastiGiacomo Pirasti, Sergiev Posadsky Orphanage for Deaf & Blind Children

Giacomo Pirasti Giacomo Pirasti, Sergiev Posadsky Orphanage for Deaf & Blind Children

Mae Ryan Mae Ryan, Rehabilitation Center for Children with Special Needs in Tver

Mae RyanMae Ryan, Rehabilitation Center for Children with Special Needs in Tver

Nancy BorowickNancy Borowick, Dmitrov Orphanage for the Handicapped

Nancy Borowick Nancy Borowick, Dmitrov Orphanage for the Handicapped

Nastya GolovenchenkoNastya Golovenchenko, Sergiev Posad Orphanage for Deaf & Blind Children

Nastya Golovenchenko Nastya Golovenchenko, Sergiev Posad Orphanage for Deaf & Blind Children

Nikita ShokhovNikita Shokhov, Dmitrov Orphanage for Children with Physical Defects

Nikita ShokhovNikita Shokhov, Dmitrov Orphanage for Children with Physical Defects

Sofia TatarinovaSofia Tatarinova, Orphanage for Blind & Deaf Children

Sofia TatarinovaSofia Tatarinova, Orphanage for Blind & Deaf Children

Tanya GodardTanya Godard, Dmitrov Orphanage for Disabled Children

Tanya GodardTanya Godard, Dmitrov Orphanage for Disabled Children

Giampaolo Sgura

Russian model Irina Shayk is joined by Aussie twins Jordan & Zac Stenmark in the September 2013 issue of Allure Russia, photographed by Giampaolo Sgura and styled by Anya Ziourova with hair by Hauke Krause and makeup by Niki Mnray. Taken from Fashiontography

All images © Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

David Roemer

Russian model Irina Shayk is photographed by David Roemer and styled by Vadim Galaganov for the August 2013 issue of GQ Russia, with hair by Rolando Beauchamp and makeup by Niki Mnray. Taken from Fashiontography

All images © David Roemer

David Roemer

David Roemer

David Roemer

David Roemer

David Roemer

David Roemer

David Roemer

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

I now have a quite an extensive social support network in Kiev, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, and those connections have been crucial in my gaining access to situations. I occasionally defer to the old-fashioned “drive by” method of just meeting strangers in the street and asking them to model for me. I simultaneously see my subject matter, the new East, as an extension of my own experience and something teetering on the verge of the absurd.
—Sasha Rudensky

Brooklyn-based photographer Sasha Rudensky was born in Moscow, Russia in the late 70s. When asked why she continues to photograph in Russia and Ukraine, she has no better explanation other than being genetically imprinted to return to the visual stimuli of her childhood. She has an ongoing fascination with the contradiction, absurdity, and exaggeration of post Soviet space. This explains the theatricality of her work. Brightness, her ongoing project of four years, refers to the yearning to be beautiful and memorable. The East manifestation of beauty is set apart by its showiness and its need for materiality, and Rudensky looks to capture that in both her interiors and individuals. She is particularly interested in the new generation that has come of age after the collapse of Soviet ideology, having grown up in a kind of vacuum without a sense of a past and only a fleeting and evolving sense of the present. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Sasha Rudensky

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Sasha_RUDENSKY_Photography

Boo George

Vanessa Paradis is photographed by Boo George and styled by Karen Kaiser for Interview Russia May 2012. Taken from Fashiontography

All images © Boo George

Boo George

Boo George

Boo George

Boo George

Boo George

Boo George

Maryna Linchuk by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Russia

 shoots Maryna Linchuk for the May 2011 issue of Vogue Russia. Taken from Touchpuppet

All images ©

Maryna Linchuk by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Russia

Maryna Linchuk by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Russia

Maryna Linchuk by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Russia

Maryna Linchuk by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Russia

Maryna Linchuk by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Russia

Maryna Linchuk by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Russia

Maryna Linchuk by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Russia

In his series ‘Guardians’, photographer Andy Freeberg portraits elder women, who sit in Russian art museums and guard the collections. When looking at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. Freeberg found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told him how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum even returns on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, ‘as old women do.’ Besides their stiff sitting posture and the motionless look there is a strange relation between the ladies and the works they watch over which adds a humorous touch to the series. Taken from iGNANT

All images © Andy Freeberg

Reiner Reidler

I recognized a difference approaching people at night. Immediately I had a strong connection to most of them – they were very open from the first moment. There was no rush, there was time to talk and express our thoughts. I am sure that meetings like this would have been completely different during the day. People didn’t hide. There was nothing to hide. There was something magical going on in St. Petersburg during this period of time.—Reiner Riedler

The White Nights refers to the time of year when the sun is visible almost the entire day and night in areas close to the Arctic and Antarctic Circle. The Dark Curtain is a documentary project by Austrian photographer Reiner Riedler capturing the transformation of the city of St. Petersburg during this time, when the nights are bright and the streets are crowded with sleepless people. Working for two weeks, Reidler completely changed his rhythm to adjust to shooting at night, often making appointments to photograph people at 4am. Riedler’s photographs reveal what ensues when the night no longer divides the day. Riedler is represented by the Anzenberger Agency. More of his work can be seen on their online gallery. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Reiner Riedler

Reiner Reidler

Reiner Reidler

Reiner Reidler

Reiner Reidler

Reiner Reidler

Reiner Reidler

Reiner Reidler

Michal Chelbin

Sailboats and Swans, shot in seven prisons in the Ukraine and Russia over the past six years, explores what it means to be locked and constantly watched. The title refers to the idiosyncratic, and almost mocking, bucolic and fantastical murals and wallpaper backgrounds I found throughout the prisons. These contradictions of life in prison abound in girls’ flowery dress prison uniforms, murderers working as nannies to other women’s babies in the new mothers’ prison, young girls serving time alongside grandmothers – perhaps witness to their own futures, and the mesmerizing human blend of fear and cruelty in the boys’ and mens’ prison – where big tattooed bodies are now zombie-like, worn down by the daily travails of trying to survive being locked up in a world devoid of hope.—Michal Chelbin

Israeli born and based photographer Michal Chelbin fostered connections along the way that gained her rare access to the prisoners. Her portrait sittings sometimes lasted for hours, Chelbin never asking about the crime committed until after the portrait was finished. Sailboats and Swans is currently on display at Andrea Meislin Gallery in New York through January 19th, 2013. The monograph was published this fall by Twin Palms Publishers. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Michal Chelbin

Michal Chelbin

Michal Chelbin

Michal Chelbin

Michal Chelbin

Michal Chelbin

Michal Chelbin

Michal Chelbin

Michal Chelbin