Archives for posts with tag: Russian

Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott

Russian beauty Natalia Vodianova is photographed by Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott and styled by Edward Enninful in the story ‘Sleep No More’ for the December 2012 issue of W magazine. Taken from Fashiontography

All images © Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott

Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott

Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott

Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott

Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott

Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott

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Giampaolo Sgura

Russian model Irina Shayk is joined by Aussie twins Jordan & Zac Stenmark in the September 2013 issue of Allure Russia, photographed by Giampaolo Sgura and styled by Anya Ziourova with hair by Hauke Krause and makeup by Niki Mnray. Taken from Fashiontography

All images © Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Giampaolo Sgura

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Irina Rozovsky is a fine art photographer living in Brooklyn. Her series In Plain Air captures everyday people in moments of leisure in Prospect Park. We recently talked to her about the work. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Irina Rozovsky

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

What made you choose people relaxing in Prospect Park as a subject?
“The project announced itself to me one evening when I was on a boat on the little man-made lake in the south part of the park. It was an epiphany. Here was this Garden of Eden, an oasis in the middle of New York’s insanity. And in its serene, lush, slightly polluted landscape was a place for every ethnicity, race, social class, human problem and joy under the sun, and from that perspective, circling around, I could see it all and feel an unprecedented hope and tranquility. I knew I had to photograph this feeling as a homage to the quintessential melting pot of the city and a larger complicated American moment.”

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

A lot of the light you photograph seems very painterly. Does the title of the project deliberately reference “En plein air” or painting outside in natural light? If so, are you influenced by this style of painting?
“Yes, I was thinking a bit about that period in painting. It was the lens through which I saw this place for the first time—an early Realist canvas complicated by the anachronistic presence of current day subjects. A sprawling view of the 19th century spotted with cell phones and coffee cups. It was a bit of a “where and when am I?” sensation. I soon realized that Olmstead designed the park around the same time and values that Courbet and Manet injected into the artistic tradition—leaving the studio to depict regular people and the fabric of daily life. I felt that the park’s stage was set in the late 1800’s and somehow everyday people continue to insert themselves and naturally act according to the aesthetics and ideals of a previous time, an old place made eternally new. And about the light—it really shines here.”

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

What do you answer when strangers you are photographing ask you what or why you are photographing?
“You know it’s strange, on the streets people are live wires and touchy about being photographed. In the park, they are relaxed and their guard is down. There’s an uncanny openness and wordless understanding in the air—I don’t often need to get into explanations or specifics about the project or the photos I’ve already taken. I try to focus on the short moment at hand and it seems that people come here to do the same. It’s a buzzkill to talk too much when I’m photographing.”

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Many of your photos such as the one of the man and woman in the bushes seem to aim to capture people having private moments in public spaces, how did your subjects respond to this?
“They’re private moments in a pretty public space so people understand they’re not exactly alone. But nevertheless it’s very important for me not to intrude or make anyone uncomfortable. This wouldn’t be good for the pictures—it would break the intimate ease I feel here and want to portray. The point is not to sneak up on or steal someone’s private, sacred moment, but to get to a place photographically where they subconsciously share it with the camera.”

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Did you become known by regulars in the park or start to recognize regulars as you were shooting?
“Not really. The park is very big and there are so many people. I recognize the regulars that sit on the same benches, hide in the same trees, but I like to keep a low profile—cat style—and come and go. Once, I was making a picture and someone who’d seen the project stopped me and asked if it was mine, if I was the photographer. That was very strange.”

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Do you think that as someone not only from a different city but from a different country you have a specific perspective on Brooklyn?
“I grew up in an immigrant family and studied languages, I guess in order to to communicate with different groups of people. It thrills me to insert myself into a seemingly foreign context and find a connection. For me social mobility is not an upward ladder but a spiraling treadmill—the possibility to leave your reality and enter someone else’s. Brooklyn’s got so many realities I could spend the rest of my life doing just that. The park is a microcosm of the greater thing beyond.”

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Irina_Rozovsky_Photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_photography

I want to sense the warmth of her heart anew, like in my childhood; to look closer and get to know my present, mature mother. To fixate, to remember, to feel acutely the moments of the life that I treasure, which is primordially a source of my own. Wise and not so wise, powerful and weak, young and mature, good and bad—anything she may be. My mom. Distant no more. Close…again.
—Alla Mirovskaya

Driven by an inner motivation to comprehend her family reality, Russian photographer Alla Mirovskaya explores the complex relationship between mother and daughter in Distant and Close, a series that reads just like it sounds. She weaves together an intimate narrative through nostalgic, light-soaked images that explore identity, personality and kinship. Mirovskaya spent a year working on the project, navigating the waters of the familial great divide and connection—a documentary process she says prompted a rediscovery of her own worldview. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Alla Mirovskaya

Alla_Mirovskaya_photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_Photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_Photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_Photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_Photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_Photography

Alla_Mirovskaya_Photography

Craig McDean

Russian beauty Sasha Pivovarova is photographed by Craig McDean and styled by Karl Templer in the story ‘Seduction’ for the April 2013 issue of Interview magazine. Taken from Fashiontography

All images © Craig McDean

Craig McDean
Craig McDean
Craig McDean
Craig McDean
Craig McDean
Craig McDean
Craig McDean
Craig McDean
Craig McDean
Craig McDean

Jana-Romanova Waiting

A few years ago Russian photographer Jana Romanova started photographing her pregnant friends, acquaintances and strangers with their partners in St. Petersburg, Russia.  She wanted to capture them early in the morning while they were sleeping (or very drowsy) so that they were less conscious about their appearance and also so that their relationship to one another could be revealed naturally.  She writes: I tried to understand what kind of roles a young man and woman play in their new family. From the very beginning when he hasn’t yet realized he’s going to be a father, and she is left alone with this knowledge about a small life growing inside her, passing the step where he becomes a child himself rejecting this new responsibility, and after that coming to a part where he awakes and slowly and they start to play equal roles in the process of waiting. Waiting not only for a child to be born, but also for their entire life to be changed in 40 weeks. This series consists of 40 photographs to correlate with 40 weeks of pregnancy. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Jana Romanova

Jana-Romanova Waiting

Jana-Romanova Waiting

Jana-Romanova Waiting

Jana-Romanova Waiting

Jana-Romanova Waiting

Jana-Romanova Waiting

Jana-Romanova Waiting

Jana-Romanova Waiting

Jana-Romanova Waiting

 

Andrew C. Kovalev is a Russian photographer specializing in environmental and editiorial portraiture. He is currently based in Paris. This work is from is a personal portrait series of patrons to A.Picolo, a small Parisian cafe located at the border of Marche aux Puces de Sant-Ouen, one of the largest and oldest flea markets in the world. “The location is the reason for the variety of incredible characters coming to A.Picolo everyday to have a cup of coffee or a lunch or just chat with the owner. My goal was to capture these characters and stories behind them through picturing their faces,” writes Kovalev. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Andrew C. Kovalev

Andrew-C.-Kovalev photography

Andrew-C.-Kovalev photography

Andrew-C.-Kovalev photography

Andrew-C.-Kovalev photography

Andrew-C.-Kovalev photography

Andrew-C.-Kovalev photography

A quite good article by Will Hodgkinson, the author of Guitar man, published in the Guardian. Will Hodgkinson – Russian criminal tattoos: breaking the code

Russian criminal tattoos

Russian criminal tattoos

Images taken from Russian Criminal Tattoo Encyclopaedia by Fuel design.

Russian Criminal Tattoo Encyclopaedia

Russian Criminal Tattoo Encyclopaedia

Russian Criminal Tattoo Encyclopaedia

Russian Criminal Tattoo Encyclopaedia

Russian Criminal Tattoo Encyclopaedia