Archives for posts with tag: Self-Portraits

Daniel Regan

Insula spans across a decade of shooting (2003-2013). During this time I continually made photographs as a means to document the emotional difficulties of living with a chronic mental health disorder, as well as using photography as a tool for recovery. Whilst receiving medical treatment has been beneficial, it is the act of making photographs that address my moods and interrogate my sense of identity that has been extremely valuable in making sense of chaos.—Daniel Regan

Recently graduating from the London College of Communication with an MA in Photography, Daniel Regan chose to exhibit a body of work that has been both his muse and catharsis for nearly ten years. The images are raw and brave, each betraying the deepest of emotions without actually revealing the person before us. A mixture of self portraits and domestic objects, Regan’s everyday surroundings become a stage for struggle and abandon. The dimly lit photographs have a quiet submission even through the pain; time slowly ebbing away to a hopefully brighter dawn. Bound as a small, intimate book, Insula’s diaristic journey is one artist’s method of recovery through the photograph. Insula is showing at the London College of Communication MA Photography Exhibition November 14th – 21st, 2013. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

Daniel Regan

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Cape Times

South African newspaper the Cape Times recently launched a clever advertising campaign that went viral, transforming iconic photographs into modern day “selfies.” Famous events are manipulated to appear to be taken at arm’s length, causing us to feel even more in the middle of the action. From Prince William and Kate Middleton catching themselves kissing to Winston Churchill snapping himself on a smoke break, the advertising is a fun, contemporary twist on journalistic history. With the tagline, “You can’t get any closer to the news”, the Cape Times campaign is a perfectly playful blend of then and now. Taken from Feature Shoot

Cape Times

Penelope_Koliopoulou_Photography

Greek photographer Penelope Koliopoulou plays dueling lovers by transforming herself into both halves of various couples in her series Self Portraits. While working towards her degree at the London College of Fashion, Koliopoulou became irritated with the cliche storylines in romantic comedies and desired to explore what happens after “guy wins girl” and the credits roll. Self Portraits is humorous and strange, the tiny domestic dramas of everyday couples made even more entertaining when we realize the artist is impersonating both people present in the image. Koliopoulou exaggerates the positive and negative in relationships while simultaneously dealing with issues of personal identity and abandonment. Although a couple is in some ways a union of two souls, Self Portraits toys with the notion that the baggage, insecurities and expectations of each individual are the actual protagonists at play. No matter what the relationship, perhaps we are always simply in a struggle with ourselves. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Penelope Koliopoulou

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Natalie Krick

She masks her mother in the garish poses of celebrities, behind the make up of starlettes, dressed in wigs that mimic women from a magazine 30+ years younger. It’s an act of concealing in an attempt to confuse and then question or reveal. What these pictures unveil is more than a simple illustrated contradiction. They speak to a personal account of the performance of femininity and a perspective that is butted up against the tropes of feminine beauty and sexuality in visual culture.—David Weinberg Photography

Chicago-based photographer Natalie Krick’s Natural Deceptions are the large-scaled sexualized portraits of her mother, a series she has been working on for the past two years. Her more recent images include self portraits, bringing identity and notions of autobiographical fiction into further question. Natural Deceptions opens July 12th with an opening reception from 5-8pm at The Coat Check, housed in David Weinberg Photography and will remain on view through September 27th, 2013. A new series by David Weinberg, The Lure of Sirens opens the same night in the front gallery. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Natalie Krick

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Natalie Krick

Malerie-Marder
The images in LA-based photographer Malerie Marder’s intimate book Carnal Knowledge are a combination of color and black and white photographs of family members, friends and herself, all in the nude. Sometimes shot in sparse motel rooms, the images feel both intimate and distant at the same time: some of the subjects are couples, captured in private moments, with bodies intertwined; other times the subjects stand removed and separate from each other. Asked during various interviews to discuss her thoughts behind the book, Marder says, “What was I thinking when I made the pictures? This is in no particular order: fate, kink, performance, a secret, nostalgia, sensual memory, voyeurism, nighttime settings, barren rooms, stark lighting, romantic trysts, foreign environments, intimacy, and lack of intimacy, connection, lack of connection, self-reflection, and lack of self-reflection…My work has a lot to do with privacy and secrecy. I’m innately drawn to this, someone disarming themselves for the camera, in a moment that would normally remain private. That’s my drive, or, in a way my addiction.” Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Malerie Marder

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ChristieHemm_Photography

Los Angeles-based photographer Christie Hemm has always had a fascination with abandoned homes. Whenever she comes across one, she feels the need to explore inside and put together the pieces of the stories left behind. This particular series focuses on Elizabeth, a woman Hemm discovered in a house outside of Los Angeles. The run-down house was filled with personal items left behind from the 1960s and 70s. From the clothing still hanging in the closets, to the letters and dishes still on the kitchen shelves, Hemm ‘met’ Elizabeth. After she finished photographing the belongings in the house, Hemm took the project even further. She removed selected items and created self-portraits depicting Elizabeth and her family. She let the letters and clothing help her imagine who Elizabeth was, and to tell her story. The images make you feel like you are sharing a private moment with Elizabeth, a sneak peek into her everyday life. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Christie Hemm

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annadiprospero_Photography

This series of self-portraits with my family comes from the desire to create a research based on my intimate bonds. For me, the most important part of this work was obtained by the involvement of my family during the shooting, and thanks to this experience, I discovered unknown aspects of my loved ones.—Anna di Prospero

What one first notices about Italian photographer Anna di Prospero’s work are the warm, rich hues of her portraits. But after a closer look at her series, Self-Portrait with My Family, the colorful hues and tones are an obvious expression of the warmth and connection she feels for her family. Each photograph contains its own personal narrative, each telling the story of that particular relationship. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Anna di Prospero

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Kyoko_Hamada_Photography

When I first tried on her gray wig, the latex makeup, and her clothes, I gazed at the mirror for a long time. My initial reaction was to chuckle, but I started feeling a little uneasy soon after. The wrinkled face staring back at me resembled my own with thirty-plus years added to it. When I smiled, she smiled back at me. When I pouted, she pouted too. It was the first time I had met her, but she was simultaneously someone I already knew quite well and someone I knew nothing about. It has been a year and half since I started photographing Kikuchiyo-san and I have gotten used to dressing up as her. However, when I think of what could happen if we ran into each other in a crowded train station or during a walk in the park, I get uneasy imagining her say, “I used to be you.”—Kyoko Hamada

Brooklyn-based photographer Kyoko Hamada steps out of her comfort zone in her latest series I Used to be You. Her work often consists of ordinary people and objects that she stages into quiet moments that explore various metaphors, but this time around Hamada turns the camera on herself to capture Kikuchiyo-san, the future version of herself. The series was born after Hamada spent time volunteering as a visitor to various seniors in NYC. When she discovered that none of the seniors she was working with were interested in being photographed, she decided to experiment on herself. The project turned into an exploration of aging, memory, and the different phases of life. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Kyoko Hamada

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Haley Morris-Cafiero

While creating an image for my Something to Weigh series, I decided to photograph myself sitting alone on the Times Square stairs to capture my solitude in a busy crowd. After developing the film, I noticed that a man was standing behind me being photographed by an attractive blonde woman. Rather than pose for her camera, he was sneering at me behind my back. Five minutes later and at another location, another man turns his back to gawk at me while I am photographing myself sitting at a café table. I have always been aware of people making faces, commenting and laughing at me about my size. I now reverse the gaze and record their reactions to me while I perform mundane tasks in public spaces.—Haley Morris-Cafiero

Memphis-based photographer Haley Morris-Cafiero’s series Wait Watchers freezes judgment in time. Cafiero sets up a tripod in various cities and walks around the area for 5-10 minutes doing casual, normal things while shooting hundreds of photos. It is only later in front of her computer screen that she will sift through the images, looking for reactions and criticism from passersby. Cafiero’s self portraits are powerful—they reveal, expose, react, question, comment. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Haley Morris-Cafiero

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ahn-jun

These self portraits by Ahn Jun bring to mind the skywalking trend and capture the dizzying energy of modern skyscrapers. Jun uses the unsettling power of heights to grab our attention, but it’s the details that really captivate as she plays with the contrast of soft, silky fabric and the hard, industrial backdrop of an urban setting. Her delicate figure appears young and helpless as she balances precariously in the ledges of different tall buildings. Jun recently graduated from Parsons The New School for Design with an MFA in Photography and was named as one of BJP’s 20 photographers to watch in 2013. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Ahn Jun

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