Archives for posts with tag: Spain

 

Salva Lopez

Through this project I do not attempt to create a faithful portrait of their reality. Instead, I hope to recreate the reality of the experience of living with them. — Salva López

Spanish photographer Salva López documents the 5 years he spent with his grandparents in his poignant series Roig 26. Living in a tiny flat in central Barcelona, López slept in the very room where his grandmother was born decades before. From this stage of domestic history, a portrait is painted of Jóse and Marina, their daily lives and patterns washed in soft light and quiet words. Though he acknowledges that his familial archetypes exist in a world of roles and customs foreign to him, Lopez’s view is one of a compassionate participant, full of ever-present love and understanding for those who represent a part of himself. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Salva López

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

Salva Lopez

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1-Jose&Ainara
Jose & Ainara

After several conversations with (male) friends about how relationships between men and women have changed since their parent’s generation, Spanish photographer Jon Uriarte had a brilliant idea for a photo series. He wanted to make images that showed not only the equality of balance in heterosexual relationships, but also the feeling of confusion the male may be experiencing with this change. He began this series, which he calls The Men Under the Influence by taking photos of couples together in the same image. After some time, he realized that a more effective image was to photograph the man alone, dressed in his girlfriends clothing in their shared apartment or house. Uriarte photographed the series over a period of three years in both the US and Spain. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Jon Uriarte

4Javi&Gabi
Javi & Gabi

5-Santi&Sabela
Santi & Sabela

8-Matias&Sarah
Matias & Sarah

9-Marcos&Lucia
Marcos & Lucia

10-Victor&Ana
Victor & Ana

2-Carlos&Naia
Carlos & Naia

7-Steve&Fonlin
Steve & Fonlin

Martin_Parr_Photography
GB. England. Kent. Margate. 1986. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

You can read a lot about a country by looking at its beaches: across cultures, the beach is that rare public space in which all absurdities and quirky national behaviors can be found.—Martin Parr

We can’t say enough about British photographer Martin Parr‘s new book, Life’s a Beach, published by Aperture this year. Parr’s coastal infatuation started in the 1970s—you may recall his 1986 release of The Last Resort, a capture of the seaside resort of New Brighton, near Liverpool. He has since continued to document beach-goers from all corners of the world—Argentina, Brazil, China, Spain, Italy, Latvia, Japan, the United States, Mexico, Thailand, and of course, the U.K. Compiling 100 sun-soaked images of intriguing and eccentric characters in sand and sea, Life’s a Beach is a true delight. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Martin Parr

Martin_Parr_Photography
Italy. Lake Garda. Riva del Garda. 1999. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

Martin_Parr_Photography
GB. England. Mablethorpe. 1992. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

Martin_Parr_Photography
GB. England. Weymouth. 2000. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

Martin_Parr_Photography
Japan. Miyazaki. The Ocean Dome. 1996. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

Martin_Parr_Photography
Belgium. Knokke. 2001. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

Martin_Parr_Photography
Italy. Lake Garda. 1999. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

Martin_Parr_Photography

Norman Jean Roy

Monica Bellucci by Norman Jean Roy for Vanity Fair Spain’s February 2013. Taken from Fashiontography

All images © Norman Jean Roy

Norman Jean Roy
Norman Jean Roy
Norman Jean Roy
Norman Jean Roy
Norman Jean Roy
Norman Jean Roy
Norman Jean Roy

Lluís Artús

La Platja (The Beach) is Spanish photographer Lluis Artus‘ bright and bold document of Barcelona beach culture. Formerly a professional deep-sea diver, Artus took up photography after a serious diving accident. Ironically, the accident occurred when Artus was building protecting breakwaters for the same beaches he would come to photograph in La Platja.

Artus documents a unique cast of characters in a style that teeters on the edge of commercial and personal work; that hard flash demanding our attention—not to mention highlighting the sun-baked skin of his subjects. La Platja feels like the ultimate beach party, one that almost seems too good to be real. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Lluis Artus

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

Lluís Artús

cyril-porchet photography

Young Swiss photographer Cyril Porchet’s final year show included this awesome series of the most opulent Baroque church altars he could find in Spain, Austria and Germany. His intention was to explore the seductive power of display. What is extraordinary is how much you lose all sense of perspective and depth, such is the overabundance of detail. I like how the odd feature confuses all the more; like the red rope of the ornamental light in the image below for instance which neatly splices the image in half. I could pore over these for hours and hours. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Cyril Porchet

cyril-porchet photography

cyril-porchet photography

cyril-porchet photography

cyril-porchet photography

cyril-porchet photography

cyril-porchet photography

cyril-porchet photography

 

42º C Manolo Espaliú photography

Manolo Espaliú is a fine art photographer based in Seville, Spain. We asked him some questions about his series, 42º, which recently won him the Nuevo Talento FNAC de Fotografía 2012 award. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Manolo Espaliú

What is it about city streets, those in Seville in particular, that draws you to photograph them?
‘Seville is probably the warmest city in Europe. Most of the summer it’s over 105ºF. Due to this, the Moorish (who lived here from 8th to 13th century) left us a downtown with an urban environment close to Arabic Old Medinas, with very narrow streets, to avoid the extreme sunrays during the harshest hours of the day. Most of the Sevillians avoid going out on the streets. Only tourists go out for sightseeing. As Seville is a very touristy city, you can find a lot of people walking in the streets. So it’s a nice place for street photographers.’

42º C Manolo Espaliú photography

The way you use light is really beautiful, revealing only a little and leaving the rest shrouded in mystery. Can you talk about why you chose to depict the streets of Seville in such a way?
‘In fact, 42º C (108º F) comes from a mere technical and observation exercise. All photographers in Seville know the sky there is wonderful, but not for shooting. At certain times in summer, it is impossible to work. The light is extremely tough and any attempt to do something subject to the traditional rules of photography is so difficult. So I decided to push things a little more and turn this “inconvenience” in my favor.

42º C Manolo Espaliú photography

‘I admire photographers like Trent Parke and I consider it interesting to see how he works, creating certain atmospheres while playing with extreme lights and deep shadows. ‘I just used the natural light in the same way lights are used at photographic studios. As I said before, my city has an Islamic origin and the streets are very narrow, so I chose the streets oriented to the west when the sun was hiding and the effect is very similar to studio lighting. When the light is so harsh, and you measure the highlights, the rest go into black easily. All photographers know this effect very well, especially if they usually work with flashes – even when it’s daylight. ‘The city street is full of anonymous individuals that often go by in a blur. But instead of highlighting that aspect of the street, you have depicted the street as an alternative space, one that has isolated the figure and removes the context of the environment.’

Are you trying to depict the psychological space of the pedestrian?
‘Sure. What I wanted to show is the exact moment where people come from the shadow (which is like a shelter) and go where the sun burns. In this orange line is where we can observe signs of anxiety on their faces or them interacting with each other through disquieted gestures.

42º C Manolo Espaliú photography

‘I’ve been suffering from this for the last 20 summers and I wanted to share this annoying feeling in this exact moment through this orange line that divides what the shadows hide and what the light makes visible. I did not want Seville to be the main character in my work. That’s why I tried to avoid any references to the space context.’

42º C Manolo Espaliú photography

It’s hard for me not to think of drawing and painting when I look at your images because of they way in which you use light. Do you look at painting?
‘Well, I should say that I’m not too much into drawing and painting, especially if you consider classic painting. I’m more interested in contemporary art. But obviously I know of a lot of artists that worked with this “chiaroscuro” style, in particular, most of the 17th century Sevillian School painters (Valdes Leal, Zurbaran, Murillo, and even Velazquez). But this is something that didn’t come to me from studying painters. I think I have assimilated it unconsciously into my personal imaginary.’

42º C Manolo Espaliú photography

I also see a lot of photographic references in your work – like Philip Lorca Dicorcia and Ray Metzker. Both artists used the street as a stage and were very conscious about the way in which they used light to highlight that. Do you agree that you are doing something similar?

‘Obviously, I’m doing something similar but I was not thinking of Lorca diCorcia or Metzker while working. I can say that some time ago I wanted to research about how Trent Parke uses light and shadows to create intriguing atmospheres that invite us to wonder about those pictures. In fact, I didn’t know the work of Ray Metzker when I was working on 42º C and I now wonder why. His work is absolutely amazing, but sadly here in Europe, is not well known as in the States. ‘In my line, you can see the works of Colombian Manuel Vazquez or even Jhad Nga.’

42º C Manolo Espaliú photography

 

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

There is an undeniable nucleus of initial interest, a question that from the occidental perspective is easy to think about. How does a society really live, each of its members, in a human and social organization which is apparently exemplary and with an enviable lifestyle? There is a feeling that despite enjoying all the comforts of a modern society, the inhabitants of Tokyo are far away from what was, conventionally, understood as an ideal of happiness. It is easy to find oneself isolated and alone among a crowd. Enjoying the comfort and economic safety is not a synonym of complete personal realization. A frenetic pace of life can ruin any personal initiative and any possibility of creative life. From this clash, I could observe a dislocation of the people of this huge metropolis, as if they did not strike a balance between feeling isolated and alone among the crowd. To sum up, the paradox was solved in a manifestation of solitude, in a great distress, in a sensation of individual frustration. Was that possible to detect and turn it into images? A difficulty due to the fact that I had to face up a perception of a completely subjective and debatable reality. It is not easy to show the breathlessness of the Taboo, the passive attitude or the nightmare of routine.—Salvi Danes

Salvi Danes is a Spanish photographer based in Barcelona, Spain. His work has been honored by the Lucie Foundation, Sony World Photography, IPA, and many others. This work is from his series, Dark Isolation: Tokyo. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Salvi Danes

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Tokyo Salvi-Danes photography

Markel Redondo is a photographer based between Bilbao (Spain) and Bayonne (France) from where he covers stories in all of Spain and South West France. Spanorama, Building Spain’s Ruins deals with the Spanish economic crisis and failed real estate market. Redondo writes: ‘Spain is one of the countries hardest hit by the European economic crisis. Thanks to a highly unstable financial and real estate market, an estimated 1.2 million new empty houses litter the landscape, affecting a large majority of the population. In parallel, unemployment figures are growing to such an extent that in some areas, especially in the south, cities are experiencing unemployment rates as high as 40%.’ Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Markel Redondo

Markel-Redondo photography

Markel-Redondo photography

Markel-Redondo photography

Markel-Redondo photography

Markel-Redondo photography

Markel-Redondo photography

Markel-Redondo photography

Markel-Redondo photography

bruce springsteen

Tonight Araceli and I are going to see Bruce Springsteen at Estadi Olímpic here in Barcelona. I might be more excited than she is right now but I’m sure she will get in to it as soon as the Boss enter the stage. It’s a shame I didn’t get a chance to see him earlier while Clemons was still alive but there is not much you can do about that now. If he doesn’t play the whole Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J. album I’m going to be highly disappointed but I guess it’s mostly going to be songs from his new Wrecking ball album and a few hours of old hits to keep people happy.