Archives for posts with tag: United States

Olivia LocherIn Texas it is illegal for children to have unusual haircuts.

Graduating just this year with a BFA from the School of Visual Arts, photographer Olivia Locher has already made a name for herself with her masterful use of color and playful sensibilities. In her ongoing series I Fought The Law, Locher turns unusual still-existing laws in the United States into quirky, absurdist photographs full of candy-colored grit and humor. The flagrant disobedience of these bizarre laws make the series even more good fun and we’re happy to report that Locher intends to defy rules and regulations across all 50 states. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Olivia Locher

Olivia LocherIn Alabama it’s illegal to have an ice cream cone in your back pocket at all times.

Olivia LocherIn Hawaii coins are not allowed to be placed in one’s ears.

Olivia LocherIn Connecticut pickles must bounce to officially be considered pickles.

Olivia LocherIn California nobody is allowed to ride a bicycle in a swimming pool.

Olivia LocherIn Wisconsin it is illegal to serve apple pie in public restaurants without cheese.

Olivia LocherIn Delaware it is illegal to wear pants that are “form-fitting” around the waist.

Olivia LocherIn Arizona you may not have more than two dildos in a house.

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Rian_Dundon_Photography

This project grew out of my existing personal relations—mostly people I grew up with who I hadn’t seen since high school. Coming home I found people dealing with everyday issues: employment, housing, family. Some were in a state of recovery or relapse into addiction. A few had been locked up. I saw in them some reflection of the dislocation I was feeling: not just with returning home after years away but with this growing sense of loss that perhaps is the natural company of aging. These weren’t the innocent kids I had grown up with and I didn’t know how to reconcile my former associations with home with the new reality I had returned to. It was like I had missed the intervening chapters of an alternate life and was now walking in on its aftermath. The good years had happened without me.—Rian Dundon

When photographer Rian Dundon returned home in 2012 after six years photographing in China, he felt adrift. He knew it was time to go back to California, but he’d been away so long he wasn’t sure what California meant anymore. So he decided to figure it out through his camera. His attraction to the menace, potential, and finality of the place—the Westward limit of these expansive United States—made him look at that particularly American blend of individualism and isolation as it applied to his friends and himself. His photographs present an unsettling series of threadbare cultural symbols, worn landscapes, and youth just past. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Rian Dundon

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Martin_Parr_Photography
GB. England. Kent. Margate. 1986. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

You can read a lot about a country by looking at its beaches: across cultures, the beach is that rare public space in which all absurdities and quirky national behaviors can be found.—Martin Parr

We can’t say enough about British photographer Martin Parr‘s new book, Life’s a Beach, published by Aperture this year. Parr’s coastal infatuation started in the 1970s—you may recall his 1986 release of The Last Resort, a capture of the seaside resort of New Brighton, near Liverpool. He has since continued to document beach-goers from all corners of the world—Argentina, Brazil, China, Spain, Italy, Latvia, Japan, the United States, Mexico, Thailand, and of course, the U.K. Compiling 100 sun-soaked images of intriguing and eccentric characters in sand and sea, Life’s a Beach is a true delight. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Martin Parr

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Italy. Lake Garda. Riva del Garda. 1999. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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GB. England. Mablethorpe. 1992. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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GB. England. Weymouth. 2000. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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Japan. Miyazaki. The Ocean Dome. 1996. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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Belgium. Knokke. 2001. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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Italy. Lake Garda. 1999. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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Bryan Schutmaat photography

Since he picked up photography in 2003, Bryan Schutmaat’s work has been exhibited and published in the United States, Europe, Asia and Australia. Bryan is a member of Young Photographers United, and last year he was featured in the Humble Arts Foundation’s Collectors’ Guide to Emerging Art Photography. He holds a degree in history from the University of Houston and will pursue an MFA in photography in the fall of 2010 at the University of Hartford. This work is from his series, Western Frieze. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Bryan Schutmaat

Bryan Schutmaat photography

Bryan Schutmaat

Bryan Schutmaat

Bryan Schutmaat photography

Bryan Schutmaat photography

Bryan Schutmaat photography

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Beyond the stereotypes and cliches, little is known to most of the world of the customs and traditions of the Gypsies. Traditionally perceived as strangers, surrounded by distrust, they have always existed in isolated groups on the margins of developing European communities. But their contribution to the general cultural heritage, especially in music, dance and various handicrafts, is unquestionable. I have tried to make a plea for tolerance towards those whose lifestyles, religion, and rituals differ from our own. My journeys, tracing the lives of present-day Gypsies in ten countries, have confirmed my earlier belief that little has changed for the Romany. It seems that we have not yet learned the lesson of tolerance toward people who live differently from ourselves.—Tomasz Tomaszewski

Tomasz Tomaszewski is a press photographer whose work has appeared in Stern, Paris Match, GEO, New York Times, Time, Fortune, Vogue, Die Zeit and Elle. He’s been contributing to National Geographic for over twenty years and has published 18 photographic essays for the magazine. Tomaszewski currently teaches photography in the United States, Germany, Italy, and Poland, where he is based. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Tomasz Tomaszewski

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Gypsies Tomasz-Tomaszewski photography

Flying the friendly skies, New York editorial photographer Brian Finke crisscrossed the United States photographing flight attendants on Delta, JetBlue, Hawaiian, Hooters Air, Southwest, and Song airlines before going abroad with such carriers as Air France, Qantas, and British Airways. In London, Finke visited a flight attendant school complete with emergency rafts and billowing smoke, and then, continuing east, he traveled on Air Asia, Thai, Tiger, ANA, Japan, and Cathay Pacific. The result of two years of travel is Flight Attendants, a collection of photographs documenting the lives of those adventurous souls who choose to work at 40,000 feet. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Brian Finke

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Flight-Attendants Brian Finke photography

Flight-Attendants Brian Finke photography

Flight-Attendants Brian Finke photography

Flight-Attendants Brian Finke photography

Flight-Attendants Brian Finke photography

Flight-Attendants Brian Finke photography

Flight-Attendants Brian Finke photography

Flight-Attendants Brian Finke photography

Andri Tambunan was born in Jakarta, Indonesia and moved to the United States when he was ten. In 2008, after years of working in the corporate world, he quit his job and decided to travel the world. When Tambunan found himself in the middle of Nov. 26 terrorist attack in Mumbai, India, his first instinct was to grab his camera and document the series of events that followed. When he returned to the United States, he sold most of his possessions, and started pursuing photography concentrating on social documentary issues around the world. Tambunan holds a degree in Photography from Sacramento State University.

Of this project he writes: ‘In 2009 I started Against all Odds, a project documenting the HIV/AIDS epidemic among indigenous Papuans in Indonesia. Currently, Papua has the highest HIV/AIDS infection rate in the country, 15 times higher than the national average and the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence outside of Africa. Awareness of the virus among indigenous Papuans is low, and preventive care and sufficient medical support and counseling are also lacking. This issue is currently under-documented and due to political situation in Papua foreign journalists are prohibited access’. Taken from Feature Shoot.

All images © Andri Tambunan

Andri Tambunan

Andri Tambunan photography Indonesia HIV

Andri Tambunan photography Indonesia HIV

Andri Tambunan photography Indonesia HIV

Andri Tambunan photography Indonesia HIV

Andri Tambunan photography Indonesia HIV

Andri Tambunan photography Indonesia HIV