Archives for posts with tag: book

sarah_carp_Photography

Published into a book this year by Kehrer Verlag, Related Donor /Donneuse apparentée is Swiss photographer Sarah Carp’s deeply personal body of work, an intimate chronicle of life, love, and loss. Carp began documenting her brother Henri from the day he was diagnosed with leukemia until his death just one year later. The mix of imagery oscillates between hope and helplessness, capturing the unpredictability of a journey unfolding. Within a story so powerful and private, Carp is gracious to let us in. Below are her words, equally as emotive and poignant as the work. During illness, to live becomes a constant quest. My camera became my best friend. It served as a barrier between myself and the world. It watched me during my stem cell donation to my brother and it accompanied and joined us together during this whole life experience. At the beginning it was me who felt the need to photograph him. At the end it was he who asked to be photographed. One single identical chromosome and we are compatible and tied together forever. This gift allows me to offer hope and to fight my own feeling of powerlessness. Under the sheets, the metamorphosis happens slowly. The blood flows through the intravenous line and enters his body. In the hope of a rebirth, a battle takes place in the darkness of his cocoon. A butterfly appears. Henri followed his path, he left faster than expected. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Sarah Carp

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sarah_carp_Photography

sarah_carp_Photography

sarah_carp_Photography

sarah_carp_Photography

sarah_carp_Photography

sarah_carp_Photography

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Malerie-Marder
The images in LA-based photographer Malerie Marder’s intimate book Carnal Knowledge are a combination of color and black and white photographs of family members, friends and herself, all in the nude. Sometimes shot in sparse motel rooms, the images feel both intimate and distant at the same time: some of the subjects are couples, captured in private moments, with bodies intertwined; other times the subjects stand removed and separate from each other. Asked during various interviews to discuss her thoughts behind the book, Marder says, “What was I thinking when I made the pictures? This is in no particular order: fate, kink, performance, a secret, nostalgia, sensual memory, voyeurism, nighttime settings, barren rooms, stark lighting, romantic trysts, foreign environments, intimacy, and lack of intimacy, connection, lack of connection, self-reflection, and lack of self-reflection…My work has a lot to do with privacy and secrecy. I’m innately drawn to this, someone disarming themselves for the camera, in a moment that would normally remain private. That’s my drive, or, in a way my addiction.” Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Malerie Marder

Malerie-Marder

Malerie-Marder

Malerie-Marder

Malerie-Marder

Malerie-Marder

Malerie-Marder

Malerie-Marder

Malerie-Marder

Martin_Parr_Photography
GB. England. Kent. Margate. 1986. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

You can read a lot about a country by looking at its beaches: across cultures, the beach is that rare public space in which all absurdities and quirky national behaviors can be found.—Martin Parr

We can’t say enough about British photographer Martin Parr‘s new book, Life’s a Beach, published by Aperture this year. Parr’s coastal infatuation started in the 1970s—you may recall his 1986 release of The Last Resort, a capture of the seaside resort of New Brighton, near Liverpool. He has since continued to document beach-goers from all corners of the world—Argentina, Brazil, China, Spain, Italy, Latvia, Japan, the United States, Mexico, Thailand, and of course, the U.K. Compiling 100 sun-soaked images of intriguing and eccentric characters in sand and sea, Life’s a Beach is a true delight. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Martin Parr

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Italy. Lake Garda. Riva del Garda. 1999. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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GB. England. Mablethorpe. 1992. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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GB. England. Weymouth. 2000. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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Japan. Miyazaki. The Ocean Dome. 1996. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

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Belgium. Knokke. 2001. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

Martin_Parr_Photography
Italy. Lake Garda. 1999. from Life’s A Beach (Aperture, 2013)

Martin_Parr_Photography

maddie-on-things book

Tireless photographer Theron Humphrey is currently on the road with his—and our—beloved gal, Maddie the coonhound for a book tour to celebrate Maddie On Things, published by Chronicle Books. The book compiles almost a year’s worth of photos taken while Humphrey was traveling the country on a photojournalism project. Along the way he captured Maddie standing on a number of things—balancing on a basketball hoop, a fire hydrant, a bicycle, atop someone’s shoulders. Graceful and calm, Maddie never falters and her feats look effortless, no object too small or precarious to conquer. The images never tire; they are funny, endearing, clever, and meanwhile encompass the great American roadtrip. Humphrey and Maddie are making over 40 stops throughout the US and Canada at bookstores, photo meet-ups, and will be collecting 50 animal rescue and adoption stories across America for Why We Rescue. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Theron Humphrey

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Bertil Nilsson was born in Sweden and currently lives and works in London, U.K. He creates imagery for commercial and editorial clients alongside his artistic practice and personal projects. In his work, which takes inspiration from movement and the human form, he collaborates extensively with dancers and contemporary circus performers. Nilsson’s first book, Undisclosed: Images of the Contemporary Circus Artist, was published in September 2011. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Bertil Nilsson

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dancers Bertil-Nilsson photography

dancers Bertil-Nilsson photography

dancers Bertil-Nilsson photography

dancers Bertil-Nilsson photography

dancers Bertil-Nilsson photography

dancers Bertil-Nilsson photography

Jan Kempenaers is an Antwerp based photographer and is attending the Royal Academy of Fine Arts at the University College Ghent in Belgium where he is working on a PhD in the visual arts about the picturesque landscape. Kempenaers undertook a laborious trek through the Balkans in order to photograph a series of these mysterious objects for his book Spomenik.  These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where WWII battles took place, or where concentration camps stood. After the Republic dissolved in early 1990s, they were completely abandoned, and their symbolic meanings were forever lost.  Kempenaers did not set out as a documentary photographer, but first and foremost as an artist seeking to create a new image. An image so powerful that it engulfs the viewer. He allows the viewer to enjoy the melancholy beauty of the Spomeniks, but in so doing, forces us to take a position on a social issue. Taken from Feature Shoot

All images © Jan Kempenaers

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Cafe Lehmitz – Anders Petersen

‘In 1967, Anders Petersen started to photograph the late-night regulars (prostitutes, transvestites, drunks, lovers, drug addicts) in a bar in Hamburg, Germany, named Café Lehmitz, and continued that project for three years. His photobook of the same name, published in 1978, has since become regarded as a seminal book in the history of European photography.

‘The people at the Café Lehmitz had a presence and a sincerity that I myself lacked. It was okay to be desperate, to be tender, to sit all alone or share the company of others. There was a great warmth and tolerance in this destitute setting.’ – Anders Petersen’. Taken from How to be a retronaut.

All images © Anders Petersen

 

Last weekend Araceli and I went to La Feria de Sevilla.  Here are a few images just to show a bit of the feeling of la Feria.

All images © Claes Gellerbrink

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

Claes Gellerbrink Photography, Claes Gellerbrink, La Feria de Sevilla, 2011

 

 

I just realised that I completely forgot to post any of the pictures I took of my friend Jonas Linde a few month back.

All images © Claes Gellerbrink

Claes Gellerbrink, Claes Gellerbrink photography

Claes Gellerbrink

Claes Gellerbrink

Claes Gellerbrink, Claes Gellerbrink photography

Claes Gellerbrink, Claes Gellerbrink photography